Queenscliffe and Point Lonsdale

 Back in January, when the weather was warm (unlike the arctic, polar blast we are suffering through in Melbourne at the moment) we decided to take a day trip down to one of my favourite spots, Queenscliffe and its near neighbour Point Lonsdale.

We drove down to Queenscliffe, stopped a while there and ate our picnic lunch on the beach, paddled in to water and bemusedly watched three fully clothed women swimming.

Queenscliffe Lighthouse

Queenscliffe Lighthouse

The lighthouse at Queenscliffe is famous for being only one of handful of black stone lighthouses in the world.

Built in 1963 from solid bluestone and never painted  its the only black lighthouse in the southern hemisphere, and is also known as the High Lighthouse as its located inside the historic Fort Queenscliffe and guards the entrance to Port Phillip Bay.

Queenscliffe Pier

Queenscliffe Pier

After our lunch we headed for the  Harbour and took the SeaRoad Ferry across to Sorrento.  The ferry carries both cars and foot traffic in a 40 min journey, crossing back and forth between the Bellarine and Mornington Peninsula’s on the hour all day long.   We didn’t get off at Sorrento as we were taking the return trip as a scenic ride, rather than transport between the two peninsula’s.  On the way back to Queenscliffe we were followed from Sorrento as far as the South Channel by a small pod of dolphins.  To watch them surf alongside the boat was an awesome sight!

Dolphin

Dolphins!

Dolphins

Dolphins

 

Searoad Ferries, crossing from Queenscliffe to Sorrento

Passing traffic on Searoad Ferries, crossing from Queenscliffe to Sorrento

Back at Queenscliffe we retrieved the car and drove the ten minutes to Point Lonsdale.  The pier at Point Lonsdale is great (and safe) for getting under, especially at high tide with the waves crashing in.  Point Lonsdale sits on a headland opposite Point Nepean, known locally as ‘the heads’ they  frame the ‘rip’ and the entrance to Port Phillip Bay.  The Heads are just over 3kms apart, but reefs restrict  the shipping channel is only 300m wide.  Over 20 shipwrecks dating back to the 19th century lie between the heads.

 

Under Point Lonsdale Pier

Under Point Lonsdale Pier

While at the pier we got out an old broken, Nikon camera that we had brought along as a prop for some photos (see first image).   We photographed it in the sand, and then I placed it in a small rockpool to photograph.  Standing nearby was a man and his sons… and the look on the youngest sons face when I dumped the camera in a pool of seawater was a classic.  I wish I had got a photo of that!  Unfortunately I had gone out without my CPL filter, so none of those shots worked.. there was way too much reflection.

 

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