The Maltings, Mittagong

 

The Maltings, Mittagong

The Maltings, Mittagong

The Maltings at Mittagong had been on my ‘decaying, decrepit places I must visit before they are razed to the ground’ list for some time.  At the urging of my travelling companion who seemed to think there were 30 hours of daylight in each day we added it to the travelling plan of our south coast trip.  Leaving Kiama and travelling to Sydney we did a detour to take us to Mittagong.

kiama to sydney

kiama to sydney – Just a jump to the left

History

The Mittagong Maltings Works was originally established by the Maltings Company of NSW (Ltd) and operated from August 1899. Tooth and Company Limited purchased the Mittagong Works in 1905 and produced the malt used in Tooth & Co breweries in Sydney. The early 1940’s was an active period, with output of malt being approx 200,000 bushells annually. This output was severely restricted following a large fire in August 1942, which completely gutted No.2 Malthouse and damaged No.1. The No.1 Malthouse was returned to service early in 1943. The No.2 Malthouse was completely rebuilt during the early 1950’s and recommenced active operation in 1953. Operation continued normally until another fire gutted the No.3 Malthouse in 1969. Tooths & Co continued to operate at the site until 1980, when the works were closed and the site sold to a group of local business people    [Archives Collection, Australian National University]

The Maltings, Mittagong

The Maltings, Mittagong

Located in Mittagong, and bordered on one side by Ferguson Cres and the other by Southey Street it sits among housing slowly encroaching its borders. We parked in Southey St and entered through a wide open chain link gate. We explored the main building first entering under a missing door to the right of the Tooheys horse insignia.  The building is beautiful despite years of neglect and vandalism. Graffiti in the main building is minimal however.  This floor contained gorgeous old arched entryways between rooms, tall roof supports and a true exposed ceiling 😉

Main Building, Maltings, Mittagong

Main Building, Maltings, Mittagong

Main building, Mittagong Maltings

Main building, Mittagong Maltings

 

Main Building, Maltings, Mittagong

Main Building, Maltings, Mittagong

We were unable to get to the second floor, even though it appeared solid concrete I had left my wings at home and brought common sense instead so we didn’t climb up there.  There was a staircase, but all the steps were gone.  Leaving the main building we headed down a little path to see where it led…..

Pathway between buildings

Pathway between buildings

Which led us to the second maltings building, lovely brickwork with arched windows again, interesting rubble… this was looking good

Exterior, Second building

Exterior, Second building

 

Ground Floor, second building

Ground Floor, second building

Again ‘they’ had left the door open for us so we went straight in.  For something that’s been empty 30 years it was in pretty good shape.  Kudo’s to the 1899 builders, they built things to last!  We found a wooden staircase that looked safe enough and we headed upstairs to the graffiti we could see through cracks the floor above.

First floor, second building

First floor, second building

First floor, second building

First floor, second building

First floor, second building

First floor, second building

Puddles!  I love puddles and the reflections they make in these old buildings.  From the amount of mould and moss on the walls this room must be close to a swimming pool in wet weather.

Exposed beam ceilings?

Exposed beam ceilings? That explains the wet floors

First floor, second building

First floor, second building

Heading back down we went to the machinery shed.  It still has remnants of old equipment, chains, rubble, large cogs…. and little windows that look into a semi subterranean level partly filled with water.

Machine Shop, Maltings

Looking towards Machine Shop, Maltings

Machine shop, Mittangong Maltings

Machine shop, Mittangong Maltings

through the arched windows above you can see down into the lower level with its arched ceiling

lower level, second building

lower level, second building

 

The buildings are easy to get into, parking is right out front though its possible to drive your car right through the gate and up to the building.  Security is non existent, none of the nearby residents were concerned with us wandering around with cameras.  Both buildings are good, but the second was better, purely because there was more we could explore, as unlike building one, in this one we could get to the upper floors.

I would definitely suggest taking a friend with you though, it’s not somewhere I would go alone.  Too many holes in the floor to fall through, debris to fall over and break a leg etc., it’s a great location, easy to spend a few hours there, but it is a large block with all the dangers that go with derelict buildings.  Staircase in second building is pretty sturdy, the one in the machine shop wobbled a bit when I tried it, and it doesn’t go all the way to the top floor.  Staircase is main building is gone.. someone has removed all the wooden steps.  If you are looking for a real ‘walk through’ before your go check out Abandoned Australia and my Abandoned Decay gallery for more location

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One Comment

  1. Ruth September 18, 2015 at 5:16 pm #

    Your posts are so interesting. I wouldn’t have thought of visiting abandoned places but they certainly have their own beauty and atmosphere. Thanks for sharing this world that many of us don’t notice.

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